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  • New Practice Jerseys for Tri-City Storm

    Tri-City Storm is ready to rock the new practice jerseys from Harrow Sports. Yesterday kicked off their training camp for the new season. Click here for a look at the preseason schedule. Good luck Tri-City Storm!

    Tri-City2

  • Harrow Sports partners with SPHL

     

    Harrow Sports has signed a new multi-year partnership agreement with the Southern
    Professional Hockey League (SPHL). This league sponsorship names Harrow Sports as an
    Official Provider of Apparel and Bags to the SPHL.

    The Southern Professional Hockey League is comprised of nine teams located throughout the
    southeastern United States. Headquartered in Charlotte, North Carolina, the mission of the SPHL
    is to provide a quality entertainment product structured inside an economic model that is viable
    for small and mid-size markets and arenas.

    "Harrow is very pleased to finalize this sponsorship/partnership with the SPHL,” said Jeff Corey,
    Hockey Brand Manager at Harrow Sports. “Each year our products, service, and market share
    continues to grow, and we look forward to growing even further with this mutually beneficial
    relationship. The SPHL has been around for years. Everyone knows how difficult it is (even at
    the NHL level) to operate a professional sports organization, yet the SPHL continues to prove
    their professionalism through longevity. This is exactly the type of organization we want to
    associate our brand with.”

    “We are excited to begin a relationship with Harrow Sports and help to increase their exposure
    throughout professional hockey,” added SPHL President Jim Combs.

    Harrow Sports is a Denver, Colorado based sports equipment manufacturer focusing on the
    sports of hockey, lacrosse, squash, field hockey, as well as the custom team uniforms, apparel,
    and bags to go along with each sport.

    For more information please contact Jeff Corey at jcorey@harrowsports.com or visit
    www.harrowsports.com.

    To visit the SPHL website go to www.thesphl.com

  •  

    Harrow Sports has signed a new partnership agreement with the ECHL, North America’s
    Premier ‘AA’ Hockey League. This agreement names Harrow Sports as a “Licensed Bag
    Provider to the ECHL”.

    The ECHL celebrates its 25th Anniversary in 2012-13 and is the third-longest tenured
    professional hockey league behind only the National Hockey League and the American Hockey
    League. The ECHL began in 1988-89 with five teams in four states and has grown to be a coast-
    to-coast league with 23 teams in 16 states in 2012-13.

    "Harrow is very pleased to finalize this partnership with the ECHL. Each year our products,
    service and market share continues to grow, and we look forward to growing even further with
    this mutually beneficial relationship. The ECHL has an endless list of players they graduate on
    to the NHL and we are proud to associate ourselves with such a professional organization.” says
    Jeff Corey, Hockey Brand Manager at Harrow Sports.

    “We are pleased to have Harrow Sports on board as a licensed bag provider to the ECHL,” said
    ECHL Vice President of Marketing & Licensing Tara Crane. “Their high-quality bags should be
    of great interest to both our teams and fans.”

    “At Harrow Sports, we take pride in our ability to provide the best possible product and service
    to our customers. The ECHL/Harrow relationship is one we expect to nurture for years to come”
    says Wes Wolfe, Account Manager with Harrow Sports.

    Harrow Sports is a Denver, Colorado based sports equipment manufacturer focusing on the
    sports of hockey, lacrosse, squash, field hockey, as well as the custom team uniforms, apparel,
    and bags to go along with each sport.

    For more information please contact Wes Wolfe at wwolfe@harrowsports.com or visit
    www.harrowsports.com.

    To visit the ECHL website go to www.echl.com

  • Greenwich Skating Club U14 team wins regionals.

    Congratulations to Greenwich skating club U14 team on winning the regionals. They are headed to the tier 2 nationals in Texas after winning in triple overtime and scoring the the winning goal at 6.35 in the third.

    This is the second time this team have been to nationals - going as a U12 team 2 years ago, as the first team in the history of the club to compete at nationals.

    Congratulations from everyone at Harrow.

  • Get in Shape for Hockey Season

     By: Sam Chapman
    Hockey season is officially underway leaving little time for workouts between practices, games, and being on the road. So whatever workout an athlete manages to squeeze in must maximize time and productivity. That means, trading in endless sessions of pumping iron and aerobics for efficient workouts done twice a week.These workouts should incorporate multi-joint strength movements combined with interval conditioning like strong man (aka strength athlete) maneuvers that work the entire body done medley style. Medley style, or circuit style, is when several targeted exercises are done one after the other with little rest time in between to build endurance.

    Heavy leg training isn't always necessary because hockey players suffer the most losses in the areas of the upper body pushing and pulling strength while the legs manage to maintain their power. Therefore, the legs should only receive minor attention.

    Another thing to keep in mind is that when training during the season, the eccentric or lowering portion of a lift can cause increased soreness. So as a preventative measure, consider replacing eccentric motions with partial lifts and sled training.

    Finally, make sure to supplement main lifts with injury prevention work to protect vulnerable areas like shoulders, rotator cuffs, the lower back, groin, and forearms.

    THE PROGRAM: COMPLETE TWICE A WEEK

    POWER 

    Medicine Ball Rotational Throw 
    2 x 4 each side
    Standing Broad Jump
    2 x 6
    Explosive Push-up 
    2 x 6
    Medicine Ball Slam
    2 x 6
    Take a stance parallel to the wall and explosively throw the medicine ball against it from waist-level. Stand with your legs hip-width apart and dip explosively into a quarter squat (knees at a 20 to 30 degree angle) Standard clapping push-up Raise a heavy medicine ball over your head, throw it explosively against the floor, and catch it on the rebound

    STRENGTH 


    COMPLEX A
    Dumbbell Clean and Press
    2x5
    Single Leg Romanian Dead Lift-Bent Row
    2 x 5
    Hang a heavy set of dumbbells at arm's length. Dip slightly, jump up, and shrug explosively Take a single dumbbell, and on one leg, keeping the back neutral and the chest and head arched, hinge at the hips, bending the knees slightly to lower the dumbbell to mid-calf. Then perform a bent-over row with your knees slightly bent, hinging at the waist, and pulling the dumbbell up to your chest.
    COMPLEX B
    Single Leg Dead Lift
    2 x 5 each side
    Wide Grip Towel Pull-ups
    2 x 5-10
    Using one dumbbell, squat down as if picking up a box with your head down, back arched, and extending one dumbbell in front of you, then lift up. Complete a regular pull-up with your arms extended further than chest-width, gripping a towel draped over the bar.
    COMPLEX C
    Dumbbell Incline Bench Press
    2x5
    Lateral Shoulder Raise
    3 x12
    Rotator Cuff Raise
    3 x 12
    Traditional bench press, but with the bench at a 45 degree angle to work the shoulders Keep the elbows at a 90 degree angle and raise them laterally to try and touch the shoulder to the ear With the dumbbell at your side, raise it to eye level, and rotate it perpendicular to the body.
    ASSISTANCE CIRCUIT
    Angle Lunge
    3 x 8
    Adduction and Abduction
    3 x 10
    Glut-Ham Raises
    3 x 10
    Simple dumbbell lunge out to a 45 degree angle and back Loop a resistance band around the ankle of one foot, stand perpendicular to an anchor point, and then pull and push against the band with that ankle. Kneel on the floor and then lower and raise your body using the muscles in the gluts and hamstrings.

    CORE COMPLEX

    Hanging Leg Raise
    3 x 10
    Turkish Get-Up
    2 x 5
    Hang from a bar with your knees locked, and then raise your legs to a 90 degree angle with as little momentum as possible. Using one hand raise a dumbbell over your head while lying on the ground, do a sit up using your free hand, rise to a lunge, then stand up. Return to first position in reverse.
    CONDITIONING MEDLEY
    complete these exercises in succession, 3-5 rounds
    Sled Push-Backpedal Tire Flips
    (set of 6)
    Farmer's Carry
    Push a weighted sled for a set distance, then drag the sled in reverse while running Squat in a dead lift position, pull the tire up to waist height, then flip it over using the hands and knee of one leg to explosively push it forward Grab a set of heavy dumbbells and walk a set distance, and come back.
  • Harrow Syncro Hybrid Hockey Glove review

    Tuesday, October 18, 2011

    We gave player / coach Sean Bucher a pair of Syncro Hybrids and told him to put them through their paces. Check out his review below... 

    Like all hockey players I am extremely particular to the gear I use. The specifications have to be dead on for me to perform within the comforts of my game.

    That being said, my experience with player equipment has been a lesson in trying to find a good mix of comfort and protection. I have used gear from numerous manufacturers when playing out (wing, defense) and coaching. I found myself sampling these different equipment manufacturers, particularly with gloves. I tried Eagle, Easton, Bauer, Reebok and Mission, but not one felt as comfortable as the Harrow Syncro-Hybrid.

    Hands are everything in hockey, if the wrists can rotate properly and get the right amount of flex, it makes a world of difference when passing and shooting.

    With all of that in mind, the Syncro-Hybrid is a great glove for the player looking for added flexibility without sacrificing protection. The glove blends traditional hockey protection with lacrosse style flexibility that other manufacturers have yet to spot.

    The glove plays “game-ready” and gave me no issues with break-in time or discomfort on the ice. The first time I used the glove was for five hours of pre-season coaching. As the day progressed, the glove did not feel heavier or become water logged.

    The lining of the glove aired out quickly in-between ice-makes and was not a hassle. It also allowed for a snug fit that was extremely comfortable to wear.

    The leather in the palm is reinforced and mesh lined, allowing for both longevity and comfort. The leather did not (crust-up) like some gloves, creating rotten holes within the palm which make the hand susceptible to blisters or burns.

    Despite the gloves higher wrist, the flex in the cuff allowed for ample wrist rotation while shooting.

    I highly recommend this glove for a few different styles of player. This glove is a great choice for someone who prefers greater wrist coverage without sacrificing flex. If you like the old Gretzky style glove with high cuffs, then you’ll be impressed.

    I would also recommend the glove to someone whom is transitioning from lacrosse to hockey and likes the flex and mobility of a lacrosse glove.

    Overall, if you are tired of dealing with the same old stiff and uncomfortable options by the unimaginative brains that continue to release the same glove with a new graphic every year, then give the Syncro-Hybrid a try. It is easily the most comfortable and protective glove on the market today.

  • Best hockey fight of October?

    Zenon Konopka vs Daniel Carcillo - Oct 30, 2010

  • Zenon Konopka talks about his father's war torn life.

    Christopher Botta from fanhouse.com wrote a great piece about Zenon Konopka, pictured left with his custom made 300 GS gloves and custom syncro elite one piece stick.

    Ask most NHL players where they get their character and work ethic, and you'll hear warm and appreciative stories about moms and dads who drove them to hockey practices at five o'clock in the morning. Ask Zenon Konopka, the gritty and pugnacious fourth-line center of the New York Islanders, and he's got some story to tell about Zenon Konopka Sr.

    "I play hockey and I scrap, and I guess people say I'm tough," said Konopka, who led the NHL last season with 33 fighting majors while a member of the Tampa Bay Lightning. "But my dad ... now, he was tough. There isn't any comparison between what I do as a hockey player and what his life was all about."

    Konopka's Polish-born father was three years old when Germany and later Russia invaded Poland at the start of World War II. Russian soldiers came to his family's home and said they would be placed in a concentration camp in Siberia.

    "The way I understand the story," said the Islander, "my father's family was left on a train to Siberia for two straight weeks before it moved an inch. People got sick. People died all around them before they even left Poland."

    His family was not spared; Konopka had relatives who died of starvation.

    His grandfather and uncle were given a choice after Germany split from Russia: if they joined the battle against the Nazis, the Konopka family would be relocated to a safe location in Africa. They went to war while Zenon Konopka's father and aunts lived in Africa.

    "Two of my aunts are still alive," said Konopka. "They follow my hockey career and they'll always be an inspiration to me."

    Sadly, his father did not live to see Konopka play with the Lightning -- or even his four years as a teenager with the Ottawa 67s of the Ontario Hockey League.

    "I was 13 years old," remembers Konopka, who was raised by his mother and father in Niagara-on-the-Lake. "I was supposed to go on a school trip to Quebec, but for some reason I couldn't understand, Dad insisted that I didn't go.

    "He worked in a GM plant for 10 hours a day, but in the morning and at night, he worked on our family farm. One morning while I was sleeping, he was out on his tractor. He went to make a left turn on the road at the same time a car tried to pass him on the left. They crashed. My father fell out of the tractor, but the tractor landed on him and he passed away instantly."

    Zenon Konopka Sr. was 58 years old. His son says it took him more than a decade before he could bring himself to discuss his death.

    "It's still so hard," he says today. "My father was indestructible in my eyes. To me, he was the invincible man."

    Zenon Konopka can talk about tragedy today because time has allowed him to see that his own story of a climb from the depths of the minors to the NHL is, in large part, a tale about his parents.

    With his father gone, his mother Arlene ran the family farm with Zenon and his sisters before selling it when he left to play junior hockey. Through it all, Arlene still found time -- like most Canadian parents -- to drive Zenon to his hockey games and practices. The few lessons the young boy was unable to learn from his dad about work ethic, he saw every day in the actions of his mom. It's easy to see why Konopka never gave up on his NHL dream, a goal his father told everyone in Niagara-on-the-Lake was his destiny.

    Those good years with the 67s did not earn Konopka an NHL or American League contract. He played for $300 a week in East Coast League in Wheeling, W.Va. He never stopped trying to reach the NHL. He won faceoffs and blocked shots, and if taking on every fighter who challenged or took liberties with a teammate in Wheeling or Scranton or Idaho or Cincinnati would also get the attention of scouts, it was a small price to pay.

    "Courage is my grandfather and uncle fighting the Nazis, you know what I mean?" he says.

    Six years into his pro career, Konopka finally started to get noticed and taken seriously. He played his first 23 NHL games with the Anaheim Mighty Ducks in the 2005-06 season. The next year, he got an earnest look in the Columbus Blue Jackets organization, got in six NHL games and played for the aptly-named Syracuse Crunch of the AHL. On a team with a half-dozen guys willing to drop the gloves, Konopka could fight and play. After averaging 20 goals and 50 points over two full seasons in the AHL, the six-foot, 200-pound center got his first real chance in the NHL. In 74 games last season with Tampa Bay, Konopka had two goals, three assists and 265 penalty minutes.

    The Islanders, admirers of his passion and grit for a while, gave him a one-way offer when he became an unrestricted free agent. More established in the NHL than he has ever been in his career, the 29-year-old Konopka isn't about to stop fighting and playing in memory of his father.

    "I lost my dad when I was just 13 years old, but when I look back at those years, everything for him revolved around me," Konopka said the other day after an Islanders' practice. "I was talking to my older sisters about him a few years ago, asking them questions about dad. One of them joked, 'I think you knew him better than all of us. You were his life.' That really kind of blew me away.

    "He was always there for me, taking me to hockey, taking me to baseball, being my biggest fan. He made incredible sacrifices for his family. I was lucky to have him in my life, and every time I'm about to play another game, I'm thinking of him."">fanhouse.com

    Ask most NHL players where they get their character and work ethic, and you'll hear warm and appreciative stories about moms and dads who drove them to hockey practices at five o'clock in the morning. Ask Zenon Konopka, the gritty and pugnacious fourth-line center of the New York Islanders, and he's got some story to tell about Zenon Konopka Sr.

    "I play hockey and I scrap, and I guess people say I'm tough," said Konopka, who led the NHL last season with 33 fighting majors while a member of the Tampa Bay Lightning. "But my dad ... now, he was tough. There isn't any comparison between what I do as a hockey player and what his life was all about."

    Konopka's Polish-born father was three years old when Germany and later Russia invaded Poland at the start of World War II. Russian soldiers came to his family's home and said they would be placed in a concentration camp in Siberia.

    "The way I understand the story," said the Islander, "my father's family was left on a train to Siberia for two straight weeks before it moved an inch. People got sick. People died all around them before they even left Poland."

    His family was not spared; Konopka had relatives who died of starvation.

    His grandfather and uncle were given a choice after Germany split from Russia: if they joined the battle against the Nazis, the Konopka family would be relocated to a safe location in Africa. They went to war while Zenon Konopka's father and aunts lived in Africa.

    "Two of my aunts are still alive," said Konopka. "They follow my hockey career and they'll always be an inspiration to me."

    Sadly, his father did not live to see Konopka play with the Lightning -- or even his four years as a teenager with the Ottawa 67s of the Ontario Hockey League.

    "I was 13 years old," remembers Konopka, who was raised by his mother and father in Niagara-on-the-Lake. "I was supposed to go on a school trip to Quebec, but for some reason I couldn't understand, Dad insisted that I didn't go.

    "He worked in a GM plant for 10 hours a day, but in the morning and at night, he worked on our family farm. One morning while I was sleeping, he was out on his tractor. He went to make a left turn on the road at the same time a car tried to pass him on the left. They crashed. My father fell out of the tractor, but the tractor landed on him and he passed away instantly."

    Zenon Konopka Sr. was 58 years old. His son says it took him more than a decade before he could bring himself to discuss his death.

    "It's still so hard," he says today. "My father was indestructible in my eyes. To me, he was the invincible man."

    Zenon Konopka can talk about tragedy today because time has allowed him to see that his own story of a climb from the depths of the minors to the NHL is, in large part, a tale about his parents.

    With his father gone, his mother Arlene ran the family farm with Zenon and his sisters before selling it when he left to play junior hockey. Through it all, Arlene still found time -- like most Canadian parents -- to drive Zenon to his hockey games and practices. The few lessons the young boy was unable to learn from his dad about work ethic, he saw every day in the actions of his mom. It's easy to see why Konopka never gave up on his NHL dream, a goal his father told everyone in Niagara-on-the-Lake was his destiny.

    Those good years with the 67s did not earn Konopka an NHL or American League contract. He played for $300 a week in East Coast League in Wheeling, W.Va. He never stopped trying to reach the NHL. He won faceoffs and blocked shots, and if taking on every fighter who challenged or took liberties with a teammate in Wheeling or Scranton or Idaho or Cincinnati would also get the attention of scouts, it was a small price to pay.

    "Courage is my grandfather and uncle fighting the Nazis, you know what I mean?" he says.

    -Zenon Konopka Six years into his pro career, Konopka finally started to get noticed and taken seriously. He played his first 23 NHL games with the Anaheim Mighty Ducks in the 2005-06 season. The next year, he got an earnest look in the Columbus Blue Jackets organization, got in six NHL games and played for the aptly-named Syracuse Crunch of the AHL. On a team with a half-dozen guys willing to drop the gloves, Konopka could fight and play. After averaging 20 goals and 50 points over two full seasons in the AHL, the six-foot, 200-pound center got his first real chance in the NHL. In 74 games last season with Tampa Bay, Konopka had two goals, three assists and 265 penalty minutes.

    The Islanders, admirers of his passion and grit for a while, gave him a one-way offer when he became an unrestricted free agent. More established in the NHL than he has ever been in his career, the 29-year-old Konopka isn't about to stop fighting and playing in memory of his father.

    "I lost my dad when I was just 13 years old, but when I look back at those years, everything for him revolved around me," Konopka said the other day after an Islanders' practice. "I was talking to my older sisters about him a few years ago, asking them questions about dad. One of them joked, 'I think you knew him better than all of us. You were his life.' That really kind of blew me away.

    "He was always there for me, taking me to hockey, taking me to baseball, being my biggest fan. He made incredible sacrifices for his family. I was lucky to have him in my life, and every time I'm about to play another game, I'm thinking of him."

    view the original article at nhl.fanhouse.com 

  • Harrow Sports To Sponsor the Central Hockey League

    Harrow Sports is proud to announce that they have signed a three year sponsorship agreement with the Central Hockey League (CHL)! The Central Hockey League (formerly the Central Junior Hockey League) is a 12 team Junior "A" Hockey League based out of Eastern Ontario that kicked off their 50th year at their Annual September Showcase last weekend."Being one of the title supplier's for the Tier 1 Junior "A" Central Hockey League is a major step in the growth of Harrow Hockey. The Central Hockey League has proven, year over year, to be one of the premiere Junior hockey leagues in Canada. We are very excited to have signed this three year sponsorship, and look forward to building a long term relationship with Kevin and the league!" says Harrow Sports Ontario Sales Supervisor and Hockey Pro-Rep, Mike Cwiertniewski.Kevin Abrams, the League Commissioner, states, “We've been watching the growth and success of Harrow Sports over the past couple years. Their diversity as a complete custom equipment and apparel manufacturing company make them a perfect fit for the Central Hockey League. The fact that the top two scorers in our league last year were using Harrow Hockey sticks when the agreement wasn't in place was all the evidence we needed to feel confident in this new sponsorship agreement. We hope this is the beginning of a long-term partnership."

    Harrow Sports, Inc., based in Denver, Colorado, is a sports-equipment manufacturer focusing on hockey, lacrosse, squash, field hockey, racquetball and tennis. Harrow serves the hockey market with a complete line of equipment and apparel products.

    For additional information, contact Harrow Sports at 800.541.2905 or by email at custserv@harrowsports.com.

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