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  • Squash magazine reviews the Harrow Sneak Court Shoe

    Squash Magazine did a write up on the new Harrow sneak court shoe for their October issue - Here's what they had to say -Have you ever experienced that adrenaline rush when a hot car is sitting at a traffic light just dying to throw down the hammer with treads that are gushing with confidence? You know, the kind with the jet black discs of seemingly inch thick rubber wrapped around a glistening set of aluminum alloy wheels waiting to rocket from 0 - 100 mph in a blink of the eye - all the while ensuring a stickiness that will let you pull a couple of G's around the tightest corners?

    I know, I know, this isn't 'Road N' Track', but you look for the same thing for your feet on the court, right? Okay, maybe not black soled kicks since they're outlawed on the beautiful hardwoods of our squash courts, but finding a faithful, dependable, slick - looking comfy pair of shoes is a squash players dream.

    If this sounds like Nirvana for your feet, not to mention your fashion sense, then welcome to the Harrow sneak! These shoes are hot - very light, supple (as in ready to hit the courts right out of the box) snug, with a squeaky grip that is like having a sprinters starting blocks providing that little extra 'umph' as you chase down your opponent's next shot.

    What else can we say? Th3ere are squash shoes, and then there are Bugatti Veyron-like treads that you'll never want to put in the garage.

    Check 'em out - now!

    The sneak is available at select retailers nationwide, and at our website,www.harrowsports.com

    Enter coupon code FREENOVEMBER at checkout to get free shipping on this and all orders over $75 for the rest of November

  • Best hockey fight of October?

    Zenon Konopka vs Daniel Carcillo - Oct 30, 2010

  • Katrina Dowd nominated for Lacrosse Magazine player of the year

    Harrow is proud to announce that our women's lacrosse brand manager, Katrina Dowd is one of four nominees for the coveted Lacrosse Magazine player of the year award.
    The three time D1 National Champion joined Harrow on the back of an incredible season, leading the wildcats in both goals (77) and points (110), tying 33 assists.
    Show your support by voting for Katrina at lacrosse magazine

    For more information on Katrina, check out the blog post

  • Harrow player Woody Clouse defends his US OPEN CPRT Championship title


    Woody Clouse successfully defended his US OPEN CPRT Championship with a four game win over the upset minded Jeff Bell. Woody came out firing as aces and quick kills dominated game one 9-0 as Bell struggled to get used to the all-glass stadium court. Bell regrouped to take a 5-0 lead of his own in game two and cruised to a 9-5 win that seemed to get him into the match until Clouse turned up pace once again for a 9-2 win in game three. Up two games to one and sensing the title was his to take, Clouse served like he did in game one and repeated a 9-0 game to repeat as US OPEN Champion.

  • Harrow Sports and the College Squash Association Renew Sponsorship Agreement

    Harrow Sports and the College Squash Association (CSA) have signed a three-year sponsorship agreement. This renewed agreement keeps Harrow Sports as the official equipment supplier of the CSA.According to Shona Kerr, Women’s CSA President, “We are extremely excited to continue our sponsorship arrangement. Harrow’s squash gear has become a fixture in the college squash world.”

    Harrow Sport’s racquets, shoes, clothes, and accessories are used by hundreds of players in the CSA. In addition, many top professional and amateur squash players use Harrow equipment.

    According to Harrow Sports’ Dave Rosen, “We are extremely pleased with the relationship that has developed between Harrow and the CSA and it was a very easy decision to extend our sponsorship for another three years. The CSA has grown steadily over the course of our agreement and I hope we continue to work with the ever-expanding programs to provide great squash equipment to all of the CSA schools for years to come.”

    “Like the CSA, Harrow is very focused on squash teams. Harrow’s customized racquets, bags, and clothing have helped make team bonds stronger for players, parents, and fans,” adds Bob Callahan, CSA Men’s President.

    Harrow Sports will have a presence at the Women’s National Team Championships – Howe Cup (February 18th – 21st, hosted by Princeton University), the Men’s National Team Championships (February 25th – 27th, hosted by Harvard University), and the Individual Championships (March 4th – 6th, hosted by Dartmouth College).

    About Harrow Sports: Harrow Sports is a recognized leader in high performance composite technology for sports equipment. Since its inception, Harrow has led the industry in game changing composites in squash, lacrosse, ice hockey and field hockey. For additional information, visit http://www.harrowsports.com or contact Dave Rosen (Tel: 303-889-9891 or Email: drosen@harrowsports.com).

    About the College Squash Association: The College Squash Association (CSA) is the governing body for men’s and women’s intercollegiate squash in the United States. It ranks players and teams, establishes and enforces rules, hosts annual individual and team championships, and archives college squash history. There are approximately 100 men’s and women’s collegiate squash programs in the United States. The CSA is dedicated to growing college squash. For additional information, visithttp://CollegeSquashAssociation.com.

  • Kasey Brown wins three medals at Commonwealth Games


    Harrow would like to congratulate Kasey Brown on her gold medal win – beating out New Zealand’s Joelle King and Martin Knight to take home her third medal of the commonwealth games.Kasey’s incredible performance also won bronze medals in the singles and doubles events, continuing Australia’s medal streak in the squash.
  • Zenon Konopka talks about his father's war torn life.

    Christopher Botta from fanhouse.com wrote a great piece about Zenon Konopka, pictured left with his custom made 300 GS gloves and custom syncro elite one piece stick.

    Ask most NHL players where they get their character and work ethic, and you'll hear warm and appreciative stories about moms and dads who drove them to hockey practices at five o'clock in the morning. Ask Zenon Konopka, the gritty and pugnacious fourth-line center of the New York Islanders, and he's got some story to tell about Zenon Konopka Sr.

    "I play hockey and I scrap, and I guess people say I'm tough," said Konopka, who led the NHL last season with 33 fighting majors while a member of the Tampa Bay Lightning. "But my dad ... now, he was tough. There isn't any comparison between what I do as a hockey player and what his life was all about."

    Konopka's Polish-born father was three years old when Germany and later Russia invaded Poland at the start of World War II. Russian soldiers came to his family's home and said they would be placed in a concentration camp in Siberia.

    "The way I understand the story," said the Islander, "my father's family was left on a train to Siberia for two straight weeks before it moved an inch. People got sick. People died all around them before they even left Poland."

    His family was not spared; Konopka had relatives who died of starvation.

    His grandfather and uncle were given a choice after Germany split from Russia: if they joined the battle against the Nazis, the Konopka family would be relocated to a safe location in Africa. They went to war while Zenon Konopka's father and aunts lived in Africa.

    "Two of my aunts are still alive," said Konopka. "They follow my hockey career and they'll always be an inspiration to me."

    Sadly, his father did not live to see Konopka play with the Lightning -- or even his four years as a teenager with the Ottawa 67s of the Ontario Hockey League.

    "I was 13 years old," remembers Konopka, who was raised by his mother and father in Niagara-on-the-Lake. "I was supposed to go on a school trip to Quebec, but for some reason I couldn't understand, Dad insisted that I didn't go.

    "He worked in a GM plant for 10 hours a day, but in the morning and at night, he worked on our family farm. One morning while I was sleeping, he was out on his tractor. He went to make a left turn on the road at the same time a car tried to pass him on the left. They crashed. My father fell out of the tractor, but the tractor landed on him and he passed away instantly."

    Zenon Konopka Sr. was 58 years old. His son says it took him more than a decade before he could bring himself to discuss his death.

    "It's still so hard," he says today. "My father was indestructible in my eyes. To me, he was the invincible man."

    Zenon Konopka can talk about tragedy today because time has allowed him to see that his own story of a climb from the depths of the minors to the NHL is, in large part, a tale about his parents.

    With his father gone, his mother Arlene ran the family farm with Zenon and his sisters before selling it when he left to play junior hockey. Through it all, Arlene still found time -- like most Canadian parents -- to drive Zenon to his hockey games and practices. The few lessons the young boy was unable to learn from his dad about work ethic, he saw every day in the actions of his mom. It's easy to see why Konopka never gave up on his NHL dream, a goal his father told everyone in Niagara-on-the-Lake was his destiny.

    Those good years with the 67s did not earn Konopka an NHL or American League contract. He played for $300 a week in East Coast League in Wheeling, W.Va. He never stopped trying to reach the NHL. He won faceoffs and blocked shots, and if taking on every fighter who challenged or took liberties with a teammate in Wheeling or Scranton or Idaho or Cincinnati would also get the attention of scouts, it was a small price to pay.

    "Courage is my grandfather and uncle fighting the Nazis, you know what I mean?" he says.

    Six years into his pro career, Konopka finally started to get noticed and taken seriously. He played his first 23 NHL games with the Anaheim Mighty Ducks in the 2005-06 season. The next year, he got an earnest look in the Columbus Blue Jackets organization, got in six NHL games and played for the aptly-named Syracuse Crunch of the AHL. On a team with a half-dozen guys willing to drop the gloves, Konopka could fight and play. After averaging 20 goals and 50 points over two full seasons in the AHL, the six-foot, 200-pound center got his first real chance in the NHL. In 74 games last season with Tampa Bay, Konopka had two goals, three assists and 265 penalty minutes.

    The Islanders, admirers of his passion and grit for a while, gave him a one-way offer when he became an unrestricted free agent. More established in the NHL than he has ever been in his career, the 29-year-old Konopka isn't about to stop fighting and playing in memory of his father.

    "I lost my dad when I was just 13 years old, but when I look back at those years, everything for him revolved around me," Konopka said the other day after an Islanders' practice. "I was talking to my older sisters about him a few years ago, asking them questions about dad. One of them joked, 'I think you knew him better than all of us. You were his life.' That really kind of blew me away.

    "He was always there for me, taking me to hockey, taking me to baseball, being my biggest fan. He made incredible sacrifices for his family. I was lucky to have him in my life, and every time I'm about to play another game, I'm thinking of him."">fanhouse.com

    Ask most NHL players where they get their character and work ethic, and you'll hear warm and appreciative stories about moms and dads who drove them to hockey practices at five o'clock in the morning. Ask Zenon Konopka, the gritty and pugnacious fourth-line center of the New York Islanders, and he's got some story to tell about Zenon Konopka Sr.

    "I play hockey and I scrap, and I guess people say I'm tough," said Konopka, who led the NHL last season with 33 fighting majors while a member of the Tampa Bay Lightning. "But my dad ... now, he was tough. There isn't any comparison between what I do as a hockey player and what his life was all about."

    Konopka's Polish-born father was three years old when Germany and later Russia invaded Poland at the start of World War II. Russian soldiers came to his family's home and said they would be placed in a concentration camp in Siberia.

    "The way I understand the story," said the Islander, "my father's family was left on a train to Siberia for two straight weeks before it moved an inch. People got sick. People died all around them before they even left Poland."

    His family was not spared; Konopka had relatives who died of starvation.

    His grandfather and uncle were given a choice after Germany split from Russia: if they joined the battle against the Nazis, the Konopka family would be relocated to a safe location in Africa. They went to war while Zenon Konopka's father and aunts lived in Africa.

    "Two of my aunts are still alive," said Konopka. "They follow my hockey career and they'll always be an inspiration to me."

    Sadly, his father did not live to see Konopka play with the Lightning -- or even his four years as a teenager with the Ottawa 67s of the Ontario Hockey League.

    "I was 13 years old," remembers Konopka, who was raised by his mother and father in Niagara-on-the-Lake. "I was supposed to go on a school trip to Quebec, but for some reason I couldn't understand, Dad insisted that I didn't go.

    "He worked in a GM plant for 10 hours a day, but in the morning and at night, he worked on our family farm. One morning while I was sleeping, he was out on his tractor. He went to make a left turn on the road at the same time a car tried to pass him on the left. They crashed. My father fell out of the tractor, but the tractor landed on him and he passed away instantly."

    Zenon Konopka Sr. was 58 years old. His son says it took him more than a decade before he could bring himself to discuss his death.

    "It's still so hard," he says today. "My father was indestructible in my eyes. To me, he was the invincible man."

    Zenon Konopka can talk about tragedy today because time has allowed him to see that his own story of a climb from the depths of the minors to the NHL is, in large part, a tale about his parents.

    With his father gone, his mother Arlene ran the family farm with Zenon and his sisters before selling it when he left to play junior hockey. Through it all, Arlene still found time -- like most Canadian parents -- to drive Zenon to his hockey games and practices. The few lessons the young boy was unable to learn from his dad about work ethic, he saw every day in the actions of his mom. It's easy to see why Konopka never gave up on his NHL dream, a goal his father told everyone in Niagara-on-the-Lake was his destiny.

    Those good years with the 67s did not earn Konopka an NHL or American League contract. He played for $300 a week in East Coast League in Wheeling, W.Va. He never stopped trying to reach the NHL. He won faceoffs and blocked shots, and if taking on every fighter who challenged or took liberties with a teammate in Wheeling or Scranton or Idaho or Cincinnati would also get the attention of scouts, it was a small price to pay.

    "Courage is my grandfather and uncle fighting the Nazis, you know what I mean?" he says.

    -Zenon Konopka Six years into his pro career, Konopka finally started to get noticed and taken seriously. He played his first 23 NHL games with the Anaheim Mighty Ducks in the 2005-06 season. The next year, he got an earnest look in the Columbus Blue Jackets organization, got in six NHL games and played for the aptly-named Syracuse Crunch of the AHL. On a team with a half-dozen guys willing to drop the gloves, Konopka could fight and play. After averaging 20 goals and 50 points over two full seasons in the AHL, the six-foot, 200-pound center got his first real chance in the NHL. In 74 games last season with Tampa Bay, Konopka had two goals, three assists and 265 penalty minutes.

    The Islanders, admirers of his passion and grit for a while, gave him a one-way offer when he became an unrestricted free agent. More established in the NHL than he has ever been in his career, the 29-year-old Konopka isn't about to stop fighting and playing in memory of his father.

    "I lost my dad when I was just 13 years old, but when I look back at those years, everything for him revolved around me," Konopka said the other day after an Islanders' practice. "I was talking to my older sisters about him a few years ago, asking them questions about dad. One of them joked, 'I think you knew him better than all of us. You were his life.' That really kind of blew me away.

    "He was always there for me, taking me to hockey, taking me to baseball, being my biggest fan. He made incredible sacrifices for his family. I was lucky to have him in my life, and every time I'm about to play another game, I'm thinking of him."

    view the original article at nhl.fanhouse.com 

  • Katrina Dowd joins Harrow Sports

    Harrow Sports is proud to announce Katrina Dowd, the latest addition to our Sport management team. The Three - time D1 National Champion will be heading up our Women’s Lacrosse division. Katrina brings years of experience on the field, and a decorated sports career to Harrow – qualities that will ensure that we continue to bring innovative, progressive and versatile products to the lacrosse field.At Harrow, our consultants are truly spectacular athletes. Hand-picked from D1 colleges and professional circuits, we believe these players are truly suited to test, refine and develop some of the most advanced sports equipment on the market. We continue this tradition by welcoming Katrina to our ranks, an outstanding player with a formidable record.

    Katrina is one of the top lacrosse players in the nation. By graduation, she had won three division 1 national championships, bringing 77 goals and 109 points into her final year. As the #4 goal scorer in her college’s history, she rounded out her college career as Female Athlete of the Year with an incredible 267 points and 209 goals.

    Often cited as a player who performs under pressure; her fearless, unwavering approach earned her the 2010 IWCLA attacker of the year. In Katrina’s own words, “Great players step up in the toughest situations, and that's tournament time”.

    In addition to her championship wins, Katrina was a finalist for the coveted Tewaaraton Award, standing alongside the top 25 players in the nation. She was also one of four nominees for the 2010 Honda Lacrosse Award.

    As a junior, Katrina played all 23 games, starting in 20. Her 75 goals, thirteen assists and 88 points shattered her own previous records, earning her the title of 2009 NCAA tournament MVP and IWCLA first team all – American. Titles that were truly earned, Katrina is a three time NCAA all-tournament team selection, scoring a record 22 goals in the 2009 NCAA tournament.

    In case you’re reading this, recognize her name, but can’t place where, Katrina’s media highlight was her incredible no look, over the shoulder goal which was featured on ESPN’s highlight reel. You can see the footage of this unbelievable shot at our youtube channel, youtube.com/harrowsportsvids

    Katrina brings this same dedication and relentlessness to Harrow. At the forefront of her game, her drive and passion will ensure our women’s lacrosse range will continue to develop as some of the best equipment in the world.

    We at Harrow are excited to have Katrina on board, and look forward to the incredible developments she will surely bring to Harrow, and to women’s lacrosse.

  • Harrow Sports To Sponsor the Central Hockey League

    Harrow Sports is proud to announce that they have signed a three year sponsorship agreement with the Central Hockey League (CHL)! The Central Hockey League (formerly the Central Junior Hockey League) is a 12 team Junior "A" Hockey League based out of Eastern Ontario that kicked off their 50th year at their Annual September Showcase last weekend."Being one of the title supplier's for the Tier 1 Junior "A" Central Hockey League is a major step in the growth of Harrow Hockey. The Central Hockey League has proven, year over year, to be one of the premiere Junior hockey leagues in Canada. We are very excited to have signed this three year sponsorship, and look forward to building a long term relationship with Kevin and the league!" says Harrow Sports Ontario Sales Supervisor and Hockey Pro-Rep, Mike Cwiertniewski.Kevin Abrams, the League Commissioner, states, “We've been watching the growth and success of Harrow Sports over the past couple years. Their diversity as a complete custom equipment and apparel manufacturing company make them a perfect fit for the Central Hockey League. The fact that the top two scorers in our league last year were using Harrow Hockey sticks when the agreement wasn't in place was all the evidence we needed to feel confident in this new sponsorship agreement. We hope this is the beginning of a long-term partnership."

    Harrow Sports, Inc., based in Denver, Colorado, is a sports-equipment manufacturer focusing on hockey, lacrosse, squash, field hockey, racquetball and tennis. Harrow serves the hockey market with a complete line of equipment and apparel products.

    For additional information, contact Harrow Sports at 800.541.2905 or by email at custserv@harrowsports.com.

  • Photos: Harrow Hockey Gear in Action

    Enjoy these great photos of Alberta Sales Consultant Ryan Steinke in action with his Harrow Pro-Foam goalie stick.Ryan plays for the Devils in the Capital City Elite Hockey League, considered the most competitive senior men's hockey league in the City of Edmonton, Alberta.

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